Tag Archive | iPhone

Apple Enters Mobile Map World, Stepping Up Rivalry With Google

by Quentin Hardy, NYT, June 17, 2012

Get ready for the mobile map wars. … So far, Google has reigned supreme in the mobile map world, with its maps on every iPhone sold so far — and, of course, on every phone based on its own Android operating system. Last week, though, Apple gave notice it would enter the battle, announcing that in the fall, its phones would no longer carry Google maps, but instead would have Apple’s own map service built in, part of its new mobile operating system. … The question is: Can Apple build a map service that does as good a job, or a better one, than Google has?

For full text of the article, visit Apple Enters Mobile Map World, Stepping Up Rivalry With Google – NYTimes.com.

LightSquared Sees Bias in GPS Expert’s Advice – POLITICO.com

LightSquared foe bias on GPS? By Eliza Krigman, Politico.com, October 20, 2011

When Bradford Parkinson wrote to the Federal Communications Commission in August, urging the commission to scuttle LightSquared’s plans for a nationwide wireless network, he signed off as vice chairman of a board of independent experts that advises federal agencies on GPS-related matters. Here’s what he didn’t mention: Parkinson is heavily invested — to the tune of millions of dollars — in Trimble, a GPS company at the center of an all-out lobbying blitz against LightSquared in Congress and federal agencies, including the FCC. …

For full text of the article, visit LightSquared foe bias on GPS? – Eliza Krigman – POLITICO.com.

Digital data privacy rules turn 25 – POLITICO.com

By Tony Romm, October 19, 2011, Politico.com TONY ROMM

… And as the Electronic Communications Privacy Act turns 25 this week, members of Congress are hearing it is time to revisit a law that never anticipated the day consumers would use Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, the iPhone and other tech staples of the digital age. Lawmakers have updated the statute over the years, but disagreements linger in 2011 over how best to revise it again. In addition, the Department of Justice has actively avoided changes to the ECPA that might curtail its broad powers — maligned by privacy hawks and civil libertarians alike — to investigate crimes involving digital evidence. At the same time, federal courts are weighing cases that threaten the DoJ’s use of the law. …

For full text of this nice overview article, visit Digital data privacy rules turn 25 – Tony Romm – POLITICO.com.

Another Court Dismisses for Lack of Standing in iPhone Application and Privacy Litigation

by Bret Cohen, HL Chronicle of Data Protection, September 23, 2011

Summary: The trend towards dismissal for lack of standing in privacy cases where no concrete harm is alleged continues.  On a motion to dismiss, a group of consolidated privacy lawsuits against Apple and others in the Northern District of California have been dismissed for lack of standing due to the absence of any allegation of concrete injury.  The court rejected attempts to invent new damage theories and while leave to re-file was granted, the court made clear the high standards of pleading required for standing and also highlighted the other pleading defects in the case that would be disabling were the plaintiffs to try again. For full text of article, visit:

Another Court Dismisses for Lack of Standing a Group of Privacy Cases Where Plaintiffs Failed to Allege Concrete Harm; Other Defects Noted : HL Chronicle of Data Protection.

Mashups, crowdsourcing and their impact on the mapping industry

by Prof. William Cartwright, International Cartographic Association, EE Publishers, July 2011. This article is based on the keynote address given by Prof. William Cartwright at AfricaGEO 2011.

… Maps produced through the process of mash-ups include the amateur map producer. This map producer has access to powerful Web 2.0 delivered software and resources, empowering them with the ability to produce and deliver maps that are both professional and current. Geographical information and base maps can be sourced from conventional providers – for example the Ordnance Survey (OS) of the United Kingdom has developed an API called Openspace which provides free data for non-commercial experimentation (http://openspace.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/openspace) – and from non-conventional sources – for example Nokia Map (http://europe.nokia.com/maps) or from OpenStreetmap (www.openstreetmap.org), the organisation providing free data and maps that are produced by individuals who collaborate to provide a free geospatial resource. However, with Web 2.0 for the provision of maps and geographical information is not without a number of issues. The following section addresses some of these. …

For full text of the article, visit EE Publishers – Mashups, crowdsourcing and their impact on the mapping industry.

Mobile Technologies for Conflict Management | iRevolution

by Patrick Meier, iRevolution Blog, June 9, 2011

“Mobile Technologies for Conflict Management: Online Dispute Resolution, Governance, Participation” is the title of a new book edited by Marta Poblet. … The chapters are is divided into 3 sections: Disruptive Applications of Mobile Technologies; Towards a Mobile ODR; and Mobile Technologies: New Challenges for Governance, Privacy and Security. …

For full text of the blog, visit Mobile Technologies for Conflict Management | iRevolution.

Google’s Web mapping can track your phone

by Declan McCullagh, CNET, June 15, 2011

SAN FRANCISCO–If you have Wi-Fi turned on, the previous whereabouts of your computer or mobile device may be visible on the Web for anyone to see. Google publishes the estimated location of millions of iPhones, laptops, and other devices with Wi-Fi connections, a practice that represents the latest twist in a series of revelations this year about wireless devices and privacy, CNET has learned. … Only Google and Skyhook Wireless, however, make their location databases linking hardware IDs to street addresses publicly available on the Internet, which raises novel privacy concerns when the IDs they’re tracking are mobile. If someone knows your hardware ID, he may be able to find a physical address that the companies associate with you–even if you never intended it to become public. …

For full text of the article, Exclusive: Google’s Web mapping can track your phone | Privacy Inc. – CNET News.

Digital Mappers Plot the Future of Maptivism

by Nancy Scola, Tech President, June 3, 2011 – 4:35pm

Every time something happens in the world these days, somebody makes a map about it.We saw it with last January’s devastating earthquake in Haiti, the rollout of the U.S.’s long-awaited National Broadband Map in February, the personalized maps that accompanied April’s iPhone tracking story. We see it every election. And with the increasing availability of free and open-source or simply cheap mapping tools, and the growing footprint of the open data movement, democratized mapping is likely only getting started. …

via Digital Mappers Plot the Future of Maptivism | techPresident.

Google’s Eric Schmidt on Tracking Mobile Phone Locations

From Politico Playbook, May 15, 2011

FIRST LOOK – Google’s Eric Schmidt, on CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS” today: “Today, your phone knows who you are, where you are, where you’re going, to some degree, because it can see your path. And with that and with your permission, it’s possible for software and software developers to predict where you’re going to go, to suggest people you should meet, to suggest activities and so forth. So ultimately what happens is, the mobile phone does what it does best, which is remember everything and make suggestions. And then you can be just a better human and have a good time.  …”

Full text via Politico Playbook and CNN Global Public Square.

Hearing on Protecting Mobile Privacy: Your Smarthphones, Tablets, Cellphones and Your Privacy

The Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law, has scheduled a hearing entitled “Protecting Mobile Privacy: Your Smartphones, Tablets, Cell Phones and Your Privacy” :

Tuesday, May 10, 2011
Dirksen Senate Office Building, Room 226
10:00 a.m.

Panel I

Jessica Rich
Deputy Director
Bureau of Consumer Protection
Federal Trade Commission
Washington, DC

Jason Weinstein
Deputy Assistant Attorney General
Criminal Division
U.S. Department of Justice
Washington, DC

Panel II

Justin Brookman
Director, Project on Consumer Privacy
Center for Democracy and Technology
Washington, DC

Alan Davidson
Director of Public Policy, Americas
Google Inc.
Washington, DC

Ashkan Soltani
Independent Researcher and Consultant
Washington, DC

Guy L. “Bud” Tribble
Vice President of Software Technology
Apple Inc.
Cupertino, CA

Jonathan Zuck
President
Association for Competitive Technology
Washington, DC

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,249 other followers

%d bloggers like this: