Tag Archive | Coordination

PA House of Representatives Approves Cutler Measure to Create Geospatial Coordinating Council

The Pennsylvania House of Representatives today unanimously approved legislation authored by Rep. Bryan Cutler (R-Peach Bottom) to create a State Geospatial Coordinating Council to assist the governor in creating uniform data standards and efficient geospatial policy and technology in Pennsylvania.The net effect of this legislation is a safer Pennsylvania, said Cutler. This legislation is vital to Pennsylvanias emergency responders who rely on accurate mapping data to locate accident victims, hazardous sites and disaster locations. If emergency service providers have incorrect maps, it could add costly minutes to their crisis response times and could lead to the loss of life or the escalation of a catastrophe.

For full text of the article, visit House Approves Cutler Measure to Create Geospatial Coordinating Council.

GAO to Evaluate Federal Coordinating Investments in Geospatial Data

Government Accountability Office

Image by dcdan via Flickr

In a letter dated December 8, 2010 from the GAO to Mr. Douglas A. Glenn, Director, Office of Financial Management, Department of the Interior:

“The General Accountability Office (GAO) is initiating an evaluation of Federal initiatives aimed at coordinating investments in geospatial data — specifically, activities coordinated by the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) and OMB. …. GAO is beginning this work in response to a request made by the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

The two key questions for this engagement are:

1. Have Federal initiatives been effectively established and implemented to coordinate investments in geospatial data?
2. Does unnecessary duplication of investments in geospatial data continue to exist?”

The GAO conducted a similar study in 2004, titled “Geospatial Information: Better Coordination Needed to Identify and Reduce Duplicative Investments? (GAO-04-703, June 2004).”

To conduct this evaluation, the GAO plans to contact representatives from DOI and OMB, as well as members of the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Executive Committee, Steering Committee, Coordination Group, Secretariat staff, other working groups, and community.

NASA Authorization Act of 2010

Obama Signs NASA Reauthorization

President Signs the NASA Authorization bill, October 11, 2010. Credit: NASA photo courtesy of Pete Souza

President Obama Signs NASA Authorization Bill

Source: Space News, October 11, 2010. WASHINGTON — U.S. President Barack Obama on Oct. 11 signed into law a three-year NASA authorization bill that sets a new course for American human spaceflight. Hours before Obama put his signature on the NASA Authorization Act of 2010 (S. 3729) top NASA officials and U.S. lawmakers told reporters they welcomed the bill’s enactment but warned partisan pushback could threaten funding for the $58 billion measure when Congress reconvenes following mid-term elections in November. … For full text of this article, click here.

Winners and losers from NASA Authorization Act

Source: Nature, September 30, 2010.Like any federal agency, NASA is subject to the whims of Congress, which funds its activities. And following the passage of the NASA Authorization Act of 2010 on 29 September, the agency’s priorities have been reshaped.  … For full text of this article, click here.

House Gives Final Approval to NASA Authorization Act

Source: Space News, September 30, 2010. NEW YORK and WASHINGTON — The U.S. Congress passed a NASA authorization bill late Sept. 29, paving the way for an extra space shuttle flight next year and a new human spaceflight plan that takes aim at missions to an asteroid and Mars. … For full text of this article, click here.

Reaction to the House Vote

Source: Space Politics, September 30, 2010. The final recorded vote for S.3729 in the House last night is available. … For full text of this article, click here.

NASA Legisltiave Affairs Website

 

S. 3729 Title VIIEarth Science

SEC. 701. SENSE OF CONGRESS.It is the sense of Congress that—

(1) Earth observations are critical to scientific understanding and monitoring of the Earth system, to protecting human health and property, to growing the economy of the United States, and to strengthening the national security and international posture of the United States. Additionally, recognizing the number of relevant participants and activities involved with Earth observations within the United States Government and internationally, Congress supports the strengthening of collaboration across these areas;

(2) NASA plays a critical role through its ability to provide data on solar output, sea level rise, at mospheric and ocean temperature, ozone depletion, air pollution, and observation of human and environment relationships;

(3) programs should utilize open standards consistent with international data-sharing principles and obtain and convert data from other government agencies, including data from the United States Geological Survey, and data derived from satellites operated by NOAA as well as from international satellites are important to the study of climate science and such cooperative relationships and programs should be maintained;

(4) Earth-observing satellites and sustained monitoring programs will continue to play a vital role in climate science, environmental understanding, mitigation of destructive environmental impacts, and contributing to the general national welfare; and (5) land remote sensing observation plays a critical role in Earth science, and the national space policy supports this role by requiring operational land remote sensing capabilities.

SEC. 702. INTERAGENCY COLLABORATION IMPLEMENTATION APPROACH.

The Director of OSTP shall establish a mechanism to ensure greater coordination of the research, operations, and activities relating to civilian Earth observation of  those Agencies, including NASA, that have active programs that either contribute directly or indirectly to these areas. This mechanism should include the development of a strategic implementation plan that is updated at least every 3 years, and includes a process for external independent advisory input. This plan should include a description of the responsibilities of the various Agency roles in Earth observations, recommended cost-sharing and procurement arrangements between Agencies and other entities, including international arrangements, and a plan for ensuring the provision of sustained, long term space-basedclimate observations. The Director shall provide a report to Congress within 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act on the implementation plan for this mechanism.

SEC. 703. TRANSITIONING EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH TO OPERATIONS.

The Administrator shall coordinate with the Administrator of NOAA and the Director of the United States Geological Survey to establish a formal mechanism that plans, coordinates, and supports the transitioning of NASA research findings, assets, and capabilities to NOAA operations and United States Geological Survey operations. In defining this mechanism, NASA should consider the establishment of a formal or informal Interagency Transition Office. The Administrator of NASA shall provide an implementation plan for this mechanism to Congress within 90 days after the date of enactment of this 23 Act. 68

SEC. 704. DECADAL SURVEY MISSIONS IMPLEMENTATION FOR EARTH OBSERVATION.

The Administrator shall undertake to implement, as appropriate, missions identified in the National Research Council’s Earth Science Decadal Survey within the scope of the funds authorized for the Earth Science Mission Directorate.

SEC. 705. EXPANSION OF EARTH SCIENCE APPLICATIONS.

It is the sense of the Congress that the role of NASA in Earth Science applications shall be expanded with other departments and agencies of the Federal government, State and local governments, tribal governments, academia, the private sector, nonprofit organizations, and international partners. NASA’s Earth science data can in creasingly aid efforts to improve the human condition and provide greater security.

See also: http://science.house.gov/press/PRArticle.aspx?NewsID=2921

Building a National Spatial Data Infrastructure 2.0

In the United States, a lively discussion is emerging on the next generation of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure, with a  focus on its governance and coordination. Below are links to articles, reports and editorials on this topic:

National Geospatial Advisory Council Reports

Federal Geographic Data Committee Reports and Presentations

2009 Proposals for a “National GIS”

Commentary

 

NSDI Related Legislation and Hearings

Legislation:

Congressional Oversight Hearings:

Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports to Congress:

Government Accountability Office (GAO) Reports to Congress and Testimony:

Executive Orders, Regulations and Guidelines

Executive Orders:

OMB Circulars and Memos:

FGDC Policies and Guidelines

The Geospatial Platform

NSDI-related Reports and Publications

National Academy of Public Administration Reports:

National Academy of Sciences Reports (PDFs are now free; for full list of Mapping Science Committee reports click here):

Academic Studies:

  • A Policy Appraisal of the National Map, A Federal Program to Provide Basic Geospatial Data For the Nation (Maeve A. Boland, PhD Dissertation, 2005) 

Earth Observation Governance, Priorities and Benefit to Society:

If you know of additional related documents or commentaries, please email us the links!

DISCLAIMER: The opinions expressed in the links and resources listed above are not necessarily those of this blog site.

GAO Reports on Federal Geospatial Investments and Coordination

Geospatial Information: Better Coordination and Oversight Could Help Reduce Duplicative Investments

GAO-04-824T June 23, 2004

The collection, maintenance, and use of location-based (geospatial) information are essential to federal agencies carrying out their missions. Geographic information systems (GIS) are critical elements used in the areas of homeland security, healthcare, natural resources conservation, and countless other applications. GAO was asked to review the extent to which the federal government is coordinating the efficient sharing of geospatial assets, including through Office of Management and Budget (OMB) oversight. GAO’s report on this matter, Geospatial Information: Better Coordination Needed to Identify and Reduce Duplicative Investments (GAO-04-703), is being released today. GAO’s testimony focuses on the extent to which the federal government is coordinating the sharing of geospatial assets, including through oversight measures in place at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), in order to identify and reduce redundancies in geospatial data and systems.

OMB, cross-government committees, and individual federal agencies have taken actions to coordinate geospatial investments across agencies and with state and local governments. However, these efforts have not been fully successful due to (1) a complete and up-to-date strategic plan is missing. The existing strategic plan for coordinating national geospatial resources and activities is out of date and lacks specific measures for identifying and reducing redundancies, (2) federal agencies are not consistently complying with OMB direction to coordinate their investments, and (3) OMB’s oversight methods have not been effective in identifying or eliminating instances of duplication. This has resulted from OMB not collecting consistent, key investment information from all agencies. Consequently, agencies continue to independently acquire and maintain potentially duplicative systems. This costly practice is likely to continue unless coordination is significantly improved. http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-04-824T

 

Geographic Information Systems: Challenges to Effective Data Sharing

GAO-03-874T June 10, 2003

Geographic information systems (GIS) manipulate, analyze, and graphically present an array of information associated with geographic locations, have been invaluable to all levels of government. Their usefulness in disaster response was recently demonstrated during the Space Shuttle Columbia recovery effort. GIS provided precise maps and search grids to guide crews to the debris that was strewn across 41 counties in Texas and Louisiana. The federal government has long been attempting to develop an integrated nationwide GIS network. The information available through such a network could significantly enhance decision–making in myriad public–service areas, including emergency response, national security, law enforcement, health care, and the environment. Among GAO’s objectives were to describe the federal government’s efforts to coordinate GIS activities, the long-standing challenges of adopting and implementing federal GIS standards, and the role of Geospatial One-Stop.

Read More…

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,254 other followers

%d bloggers like this: